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A Cemetery Begins

The goal of this blog is to support the Glenwood Cemetery Association, and to celebrate the history of Glenwood and the lives of those who built our community.  The initial posts are adapted from the script of a 2016 cemetery tour.  Biographies will be added regularly so stop back often.

The Glenwood Cemetery Association was formed on August 24, 1877, in a meeting at the Henry Rue Store at the corner of Minnesota Avenue and Franklin Street.  Those present at the meeting included Simmons, Scott, Rue, Wollan, McNutt, Lathrop, Reynolds and K.J. Kinney.  This formal action to create a cemetery association consolidated several “informal” cemeteries to the present Glenwood Cemetery location.  The five-acre property on the bluff at the south edge of Glenwood was donated to the city of Glenwood, then to the Glenwood Cemetery Association by Tory Thorson.

With the organization of this spacious, non-denominational cemetery, burials at three small cemeteries on “church hill,” (First Street NE from Minnesota Avenue to (and including) Central Square), near the Soo Depot, and in the southeast section of Glenwood were exhumed and relocated here.  A few early or unmarked graves were discovered during later construction projects.  These bodies were also moved to the new cemetery.

The Glenwood Cemetery Association maintains the grounds with funds from the sale of burial plots, interest from investments and from memorial gifts.  As you research your family ancestry and visit their graves, consider a gift to the cemetery.  The “Contact Us” page has details.

Carson Clark Henry

Carson Clark Henry, age 25, worked at the feed mill and electric plant in SE Glenwood.  He took a serious shock from the power lines above the roof of the feed elevator.  He was treated at the hospital but died a few days later.  He left a young, pregnant widow.  This story becomes more interesting when his daughter returned to Glenwood 50 years later to install a marker for her father.  She had arranged her visit with Oliver Hoplin.  Meanwhile, the elevator was being dismantled.  Workers noted that the bottom step of the stairs to the basement was white marble and thought it should be saved.  When they turned it over, they found the name Carson Clark Henry carved on the face.  Wallace Ogdahl, then owner of the elevator and power company property, turned the story over to the Pope County Tribune for investigation.  As he related the story of the stone, Mr. Hoplin came to the Tribune office with his idea for a story on the daughter coming to pay respect to the father she never met.  Serendipity?  This marker is the one Mr. Henry’s daughter had ordered.  The military style white marble stone from the feed mill rests at the Pope County Museum.

CarsonClarkHenry

The Glenwood Cemetery Association maintains the grounds with funds from the sale of burial plots, interest from investments and from memorial gifts. As you research your family ancestry and visit their graves, consider a gift to the cemetery. The “Contact Us” page has details.

Wm.A. & Jane Simonton

In 1896 the Glenwood Herald was purchased by W.A Simonton and W.J. Gordon (who had published the Glenwood News).  They also bought the Pope County Journal of 1892 owned by P.A Kroshus (1855-1910).  Simonton left town for a time.  In 1900 W.A. Simonton (1871-1912) returned as editor.  He was a grandson of Dean Stabler, early pioneer, and the son of J.H. Simonton of the Sauk Centre Herald.  Simonton was married to Jane Whittemore, a daughter of J.G. Whittemore.  Simonton bought out the Glenwood Gopher (1903-05) from G.B. Wollan and formed the Gopher Press.  Simonton died in 1912.

Simonton

The Glenwood Cemetery Association maintains the grounds with funds from the sale of burial plots, earnings from investments and from memorial gifts. As you research your family ancestry and visit their graves, consider a gift to the cemetery. The “Contact Us” page has details.

Herman J. Berry

Berry HJ
H.J. Berry was in the furniture and funeral business.

Berry & Toombs Furniture Store was built by Joseph Furtney in 1911 (on the site of a 1905 fire.)  Herman J. Berry (1876-1960) and his father Levi Berry bought John Aune’s furniture store (and funeral parlor) in 1906.  They became L.H. Berry and Son.  His father retired in 1910.  Herman became a partner with his wife’s brother-in-law W.S. Toombs (1871-1924), with the unusual name for a funeral parlor:  “Berry & Toombs.”  Toombs died in 1924.  From 1936 to 1946 Berry operated the funeral business on his own.  In 1946, he sold to Ole Hoplin (1889-1974) of Lowry, and the business name changed to “Hoplin Funeral Home.”

Berry stone

The Glenwood Cemetery Association maintains the grounds with funds from the sale of burial plots, interest from investments and from memorial gifts. As you research your family ancestry and visit their graves, consider a gift to the cemetery. The “Contact Us” page has details.

Joseph Furtney

By the time Joseph Furtney arrived in Glenwood, many of the early downtown buildings were past their prime.  Furtney brought the expertise to build substantial commercial buildings of brick.  Hershman’s Department Store also known as Corner Drug, built in 1922,  the Village Inn building (1911,) the Dick & Carol Kaus home on South Lakeshore Drive (1892,) and two row house style apartments known locally as the Soo Hill Flats and the Lakeshore Flats (1903.)

Joseph Harrison Furtney (1854-1935) was born in Canada.  He came to America in 1865, and worked on the railroad.  He came to Glenwood in 1887 as a Soo Line engineer.  He retired in 1909 from the railroad.  Furtney operated a steamboat on the lake called “Lily of the Lake”.  His large house on South Lakeshore Drive served as Glenwood’s first hospital 1911-16 (for doctors Elsey and Eberlin).  In 1922 Furtney built a large building for the Hershman Department Store at the NE corner of Minnesota Avenue and Franklin Street.  It later became Norby’s, and then National Tea.  Jim Stradtman moved Corner Drug to Furtney’s “Hershman” building in 1970.  The building was razed in 2016 and replaced with an expansion of Glenwood State Bank.  The Lakeshore Flats were razed in 1992.  The Pearl “flats” were built on the site in 2015.

Furtney

The Glenwood Cemetery Association maintains the grounds with funds from the sale of burial plots, interest from investments and from memorial gifts. As you research your family ancestry and visit their graves, consider a gift to the cemetery. The “Contact Us” page has details.

Matt & Mary Ward

Matt & Mary Ward were not the first to arrive in Glenwood, but they had one of the

Ward hotel c
Bartke Hall, built by Daniel Bartke, became a meeting hall, pharmacy, and lodging house. Under Matt & Mary Ward it grew into the Ward Hotel which, with additions, thrived until 1944.

longest running businesses – The Ward Hotel, aka The Glenwood House and initially Bartke Hall.  Matt Ward, (1848 – 1919) became manager in 1885, and soon after, owner.  He and Mary transformed it into a modern hotel.  The Ward Hotel had a “sample room” where traveling salesmen could make a better show of their wares to business men.  Under the Wards, Bartke Hall was renovated with additions to the rear and a third floor overlooking the town.  Mary Ward is remembered for her “motherly” manner to travelers.  The Ward Hotel remained open until Mary Ward’s death in 1944.  It was razed in 1945 and the lumber used to build the “Five Mile” Presbyterian Church north of Glenwood. Ward

The Glenwood Cemetery Association maintains the grounds with funds from the sale of burial plots, interest from investments and from memorial gifts. As you research your family ancestry and visit their graves, consider a gift to the cemetery. The “Contact Us” page has details.

Nick Koplos, Marvin Bennett

Koplos photoThis tombstone is, I think, unique in this cemetery with the porcelain cameo photograph of the departed.  Nick Koplos was the only child of George & Alexandra Koplos.  They came to the U.S. from Greece in 1910 and to Glenwood in 1922.  They owned the Glenwood Candy Kitchen and Tip-Top Café.  They were typical immigrants fully embracing their new home even though they were the only Greek family for miles.  On November27, 1928, Nick Koplos was skating on the lake with a dozen friends after school.  As the boys heard mothers calling them home to dinner, all but Nick Koplos and Marvin Bennett turned to shore.  One of the friends turned to see the two boys still skating toward the sunset.  They all turned when they heard the shotgun sound of cracking ice.  Suddenly all they saw was Nick’s cap floating in open water.  The boys’ yells brought help from others including the fire crew.  Nick’s friends, Harold Brundin and Clarence Swanson, dove into the water immediately to find and save their friends.  The lifeless bodies of Marvin and Nick were pulled from the water five hours later.Koplos stone

Bennett

The Glenwood Cemetery Association maintains the grounds with funds from the sale of burial plots, interest from investments and from memorial gifts. As you research your family ancestry and visit their graves, consider a gift to the cemetery. The “Contact Us” page has details.

Loren Tipler

Loren Tipler  Our town is not without tragic stories.  Loren Tipler’s life ended early in a fall from the roof of Glenwood Lutheran Church.  He was perhaps obsessed with birds, especially doves.  He was climbing the downspout of the church when it gave way.  The fall left him with compound fractures and internal injuries from which he died a few days later.Tipler

The Glenwood Cemetery Association maintains the grounds with funds from the sale of burial plots, interest from investments and from memorial gifts. As you research your family ancestry and visit their graves, consider a gift to the cemetery. The “Contact Us” page has details.