Daniel Bartke

Bartke D
Daniel A. Bartke

Daniel Bartke was born in Prussia in 1832.   After serving in the Civil War, he came to Glenwood with his wife, Mary, and worked on the Glenwood / Benson Stageline.  A trip from Alexandria to Benson had an overnight stay in Glenwood.  He owned “Bartke Hall,” one of the most substantial early Glenwood buildings and a drug store.  It was a boarding house, salesman showroom, civic hall, school and general meeting place.  It later became the Glenwood House or Ward Hotel under the ownership of Matt Ward.  Daniel Bartke was County Register of Deeds, 1883-7.  He moved to a farm west of Glenwood, which was later discovered to have over 20 Native American burial mounds.

Bartke stone

Bartke3
Bartke’s calling card

 

The Glenwood Cemetery Association maintains the grounds with funds from the sale of burial plots, interest from investments and from memorial gifts. As you research your family ancestry and visit their graves, consider a gift to the cemetery. The “Contact Us” page has details.

George & Esther Ruch / Rue

George Rue (or Ruch) came from France.  He and his wife, Esther Neely, had fifteen children as they migrated gradually west from Pennsylvania.  Six sons served in the Civil War.  Eli Rue is believed to have died in Andersonville Prison.  The Rue family came to Minnesota in 1856, and to Glenwood in 1866.  George Rue erected what is called the third building in Glenwood, a log house which served as a hotel, “Soldiers Home”, and a drug store.  Their son Michael M. Rue (1844-1900) homesteaded near Sauk Centre.  He lived in Glenwood 1866-70, and near Morris 1870-74.  He then operated a store in Glenwood.  He had seven children.  Another son, Henry N. Rue, (1837-98) married Matilda Movius, a daughter of Dr. J.W. Movius (1820-77) who settled on Lawrence Point in 1867.  Henry took over his father’s hotel in 1884, and built an addition.  In 1889 a new hotel was built on this site which later became the Minton Hotel (razed in 1970).  In 1886, Henry moved to Big Stone City where he ran a hotel.  Another of George & Esther’s sons, Joseph Cooper Rue (b. 1843), another Civil War veteran, owned and operated a store on Minnesota Avenue, and was still living in Glenwood in 1904.

Rue Hotel
The Rue Hotel, Soldiers Home, in July 1876.

The Glenwood Cemetery Association maintains the grounds with funds from the sale of burial plots, interest from investments and from memorial gifts.  As you research your family ancestry and visit their graves, consider a gift to the cemetery.  The “Contact Us” page has details.

George & Cordelia Thacker

Thacker GnCGeorge Washington Thacker (1840-1932) of Ohio served in the Civil War in the Second Minnesota Cavalry, mostly in the Dakotas.  Kirk J. Kinney was also in this unit.  He was so impressed with the natural beauty of this place that he returned after mustering out. In 1866, he and his wife, Cordelia, homesteaded in a log cabin in Reno Township, but soon moved to Glenwood.

He was Postmaster 1889-93; State Legislator 1885-86; and State Senator 1887-9.  In 1903 he and his brother Stephen bought Calmeyer’s Store, and went into business as Thacker Brothers’ Store.  George became the first elected mayor of Glenwood.  It is sometimes said that Senator Shipstead, Glenwood’s early dentist, was Mayor of Glenwood.  Technically, Shipstead was the last president of the village council.  Thacker was the first elected mayor of Glenwood.

There is a story that George requested a plot on this section of the cemetery so that on the rising up day, he would be greeted by the beautiful scene of the lake again.

The Glenwood Cemetery Association maintains the grounds with funds from the sale of burial plots, interest from investments and from memorial gifts.  As you research your family ancestry and visit their graves, consider a gift to the cemetery.  The “Contact Us” page has details.

Kirk J. Kinney

KinneyK.J. Kinney was among those present at the organization of the Glenwood Cemetery Association.  If there were a “father” of Glenwood, I would nominate Kirk J. Kinney.  He homesteaded a farm in Reno township, but was persuaded by A.W. Lathrop to purchase adjoining properties to plat the village of Glenwood “in equal shares” in 1866.  In laying out the village, Kinney set aside a full block labeled “Courthouse Square.”  His vision was finally realized 13 years later with the construction of the first brick courthouse.  Kinney remained here holding various county positions, most especially County Surveyor.  Nearly every real estate abstract in the city lists Kirk Kinney as an early owner.

Kinney2

Kinney1We won’t find the Lathrop name in this cemetery.  The Lathrop family moved along from Glenwood to form other towns further west.  In retirement, A.W. returned to his native Tennessee where he died in 1891.  Kirk Kinney died in 1907, contrary to the inscription here.  He and his wife left no descendants.  His obituary was titled simply “Dropped Dead.”  He had tended his horse, returned to the breakfast table, told his wife he didn’t feel well, and his contributions to the development of Glenwood ended as he fell to the floor.

The Glenwood Cemetery Association maintains the grounds with funds from the sale of burial plots, interest from investments and from memorial gifts.  As you research your family ancestry and visit their graves, consider a gift to the cemetery.  The “Contact Us” page has details.

A Cemetery Begins

The goal of this blog is to support the Glenwood Cemetery Association, and to celebrate the history of Glenwood and the lives of those who built our community.  The initial posts are adapted from the script of a 2016 cemetery tour.  Biographies will be added regularly so stop back often.

The Glenwood Cemetery Association was formed on August 24, 1877, in a meeting at the Henry Rue Store at the corner of Minnesota Avenue and Franklin Street.  Those present at the meeting included Simmons, Scott, Rue, Wollan, McNutt, Lathrop, Reynolds and K.J. Kinney.  This formal action to create a cemetery association consolidated several “informal” cemeteries to the present Glenwood Cemetery location.  The five-acre property on the bluff at the south edge of Glenwood was donated to the city of Glenwood, then to the Glenwood Cemetery Association by Tory Thorson.

With the organization of this spacious, non-denominational cemetery, burials at three small cemeteries on “church hill,” (First Street NE from Minnesota Avenue to (and including) Central Square), near the Soo Depot, and in the southeast section of Glenwood were exhumed and relocated here.  A few early or unmarked graves were discovered during later construction projects.  These bodies were also moved to the new cemetery.

The Glenwood Cemetery Association maintains the grounds with funds from the sale of burial plots, interest from investments and from memorial gifts.  As you research your family ancestry and visit their graves, consider a gift to the cemetery.  The “Contact Us” page has details.

Tory Thorson

Thorson TTory Thorson was a busy man!  He came to America at the age of 9 in 1855.  He attended school in Wisconsin, served in the Civil War and came to Glenwood in 1866.  He held the offices of deputy treasurer, postmaster, justice of the peace, clerk of court, and judge of probate.  In 1886 he opened a lumber business.  He was vice president of the Bank of Glenwood.  His home was a favorite place for community gatherings, county commission meetings, city council meetings, and more.  Many things that had to do with the development of Pope County had their origin at some meeting held in the Tory Thorson home.  Among them: the building of the Northern Pacific and the Soo Line Railroads through here, the election of Frank Eddy to congress, the building of the first court house on Court House Square in 1879, the election of Knut Nelson as governor of Minnesota…  The Thorson house is, to the best of our knowledge, the oldest home in Glenwood and is still a private home.

Mr. Thorson also contributed to this beautiful resting place:

‘On motion of the Village Council, the proposition of Tory Thorson to donate to the Village of Glenwood five acres of land south of town for burial ground purposes, on condition that the Village take steps toward improving and enclosing the same suitable for such purposes, was accepted on the 17th day of October 1884.’

Tory Thorson and his wife, Olina, had five children; Alice, Edwin, Guy, Lillian and Mable.  Lillian’s may be the oldest grave in this cemetery.  She died an infant on April 10, 1875.  This land was not yet a cemetery and her body was likely moved here after the grounds were improved and laid out. The life dates for Oline, Mable and Lillian are carved on the same stone. Daughter Alice received a fine education here and in Europe. She wrote a novel, The Tribe of Pezhekee, from which our Minnewaska legend is derived.

Thorson3ThorsonThorson1

 

The Glenwood Cemetery Association maintains the grounds with funds from the sale of burial plots, interest from investments and from memorial gifts.  As you research your family ancestry and visit their graves, consider a gift to the cemetery.  The “Contact Us” page has details.